June
06
Posted on 06-06-2008
Filed Under (Calgary 1960s, CPR, Many Jobs and Trades, Uncategorized) by Broken Rail

Ogden Shops History

The CPR was looking for a location to build a repair shop complex in the West. To complement their main shops at Montreal (Angus) and Winnipeg (Weston). Many communities were vying to have the shops built in their community. The CPR finally chose Calgary, as it was close to the mountains and had lots of real estate, southeast of the city. That was flat and an ideal location for the shops and the town that would house many of the employees. The city of Calgary also built a streetcar line to Ogden for employees living in the city. The shops at Ogden were named after a CPR President I. G. Ogden. Construction started on April 1, 1912 and was finished in less than a year in the middle of March 1913. I have some early postcards on the shops, construction.

The Locomotive Shop was the biggest building of the 12 in the complex, it measured 307 feet X 773 feet, taller than the Calgary Tower by over 150 feet it had a total area of 238,864 square feet. And it included the Air Brake, Blacksmith, Boiler, Carpenter, Electrical, Erecting, Machine, Maintenance, Paint, and Sheet Metal Departments. Steam locomotives were rebuilt and overhauled here on tells the last one was out shopped in 1957. By that time, the CPR had completely dieselised their fleet of motive power and Ogden’s Locomotive Shop was converted for rebuilding and overhauling diesel locomotives. This was the era. I worked in when I started there in 1965. When you entered the building from the Northwest corner and walked down the left-hand bay you found the blacksmith department which extended halfway down the shop, there they built and rebuilt locomotive springs, they also repaired and manufactured Maintenance of Way tools, such as crowbars, lining bars, spike pullers, and adzes. They also made railway spikes, track bolts, whistle posts, and other railway signs. They have a large steam hammer that they used for heavy castings. Next, we came to the Pipe Shop one of the smaller departments. It had bins to store the air brake pipes that were stripped from locomotives that were being overhauled. They also add threading machines for cutting threads in iron pipe, and benches with vices for soldering copper air brake pipes. The next department was the Sheet Metal Shop where I worked we had benches to work on light sheet metal with bending machines to make locks for projects we were assembling like toolboxes. There was a table with an acetylene and oxygen flame where soldering irons were heated. One bench was dedicated to the repairing of air filters by braising with an oxygen acetylene torch. These filters came from the doors of the locomotive hatches on diesels with had outside walkways select, and from the louvers of the units that were covered in. We had a big area, where we dismantled radiators and soldered them; we then reassembled them and tested them under air pressure in a big tank of water where we looked for leaks. We had a sheet-metal sheer that would cut a sheet of metal up to 16 gauge and 8 feet long. We had bending breaks that could put a right angle bend on sheet-metal 8 feet long. We also had tools for punching holes, and running beads on circular sheet-metal to form elbows, and other sheet-metal fabrications. The next shop was the Boilermakers department where they worked on heavier metal 1/8 of an inch; they had a hydraulic brake that could bend metal. Up to three quarters of an inch thick. They also had large shears to cut thick metal, and a large punch to put holes in the material being worked. These were old machines that probably date back to the opening of the shops in the steam era. There was also a test rack where 2 steam generators could be rebuilt and tested, the steam generators were used on the passenger diesels to heat the train, as the coaches were still equipped with steam heating pipes and appliances. The next department was the maintenance bench here a couple of Carpenters and Pipefitters worked at maintaining the buildings in the shops. The final department was the Paint Shop here, they painted the locomotive hatches, station name signs, toolboxes and any other projects that needed paint. There was some real craftsman here that could do gold leaf painting, which went back to the days of the elegant railway coaches painted Tuscan Red and gold leaf numbers and names to identify them.

Now if we cross over to the southeast corner of the building. We find a door that will take you to wheel shop, which I will talk more about later. This side of the locomotive shop contained the Electrical department that was up to ran halfway up the building on the East end there was a big degreasing tank that used Chlorothene Nu to degrease the diesel locomotives main generators and traction motors. We used to go here to degrease oil filters that had to be soldered, the machinists were here quite regularly on Fridays to clean their tools. We would watch from around the walls of the tank, it looked like a big cloud inside, until something that was covered in grease was lowered into the tank with the overhead electric crane that traveled the length of the shop, from the cloud will emerge the chemicals that removed the grease, it looked like a rainstorm coming out of the cloud to strip the grease off of the object in the tank. When removed, the item was spotless, no grease, and quite hot from the reaction. Further up the shop floor the Electricians worked at rebuilding the main generators, and traction motors for the diesel electric locomotives. The rest of this side of the shop was divided between the Machinists and Air Brake department, the machinists had all their lathes, milling machines, shapers, and drill presses. The Air Brake department had a room there, where they did laping on some of the more delicate parts of the air brake valves, they also made air brake hoses for coupling between cars. That concludes the two side bays of the Locomotive Shop, and as I mentioned previously, the apprentice school was above the fan room in the northwest corner of the shop, further down were the offices for the Boiler Shop, Pipe Shop, and Sheet-Metal foremen, underneath their offices was the Blue Room where machinists worked on Governors for the diesel engines. In the southeast corner by the degreaser was the First Aid Office and further up this side were offices for the Electrical department, and further up offices for the Machinists and Air Brake supervisors. The center bay had 36 pits where the locomotives were worked on look first two pits on the west end of the building were where locomotives were brought in to the shop, there was a huge electric crane that could pick up loads of 250 tons and was used strictly for picking up the locomotives with their wheels disconnected and moving them down the shop to another pit, where they were lowered onto blocking that supported them, and they were ready to be stripped. Also part of the shop floor near the middle was an area where the Diesel Mechanics rebuilt the diesel engines. At the east end there was a large lye tank where other large components were brought for cleaning by a character named lye tank Andy.

The Tender Shop.

The Tender and Wheelshop is a L-shaped building 80 feet by 263 x 80 x 180 feet, total area 35,480 ft.². In the steam days it was used to rebuild the steam locomotives tender (the car behind the locomotive that carried its fuel and water) and the wheel shop is where they bring wheel sets from the locomotive and car departments for inspection and reshaping. The thickness of the wheels tread was measured and checked for defects and flat spots, if they had enough tread left they were machined on large lathes that could do both wheels on their axle. Axles were also checked for wear on their bearing surfaces. Rejected wheels and axles were pressed off and loaded into gondolas for scrapping. In my time there were no more locomotive tenders to overhaul, but they did use the bays for rebuilding maintenance of the way machinery such as snowplows, spreaders, ditch diggers, and cranes. I remember one time; they brought in a crane that still had a steam boiler. It was stripped down and totally rebuilt, a new diesel engine replaced the boiler, and the cab was renovated and painted. When the job was finished after six months, the switch crew, who moved equipment in and out of came to pick up the rebuilt crane, they have a hold of three flat cars and use these to reach in and couple up and pull the crane out of the shop. Unfortunately, nobody noticed that there was a shop crane mounted to one of the steel pillars of the building, and its boom was sitting foul of the crane being moved. The boom pierced through the rebuilt cab of the crane and tore it off. So they shoved the crane back into the shop, and it took another four months to rebuild it. Besides working on maintenance equipment and wheel sets, there was a toolroom in the southeast corner of the building were machinists and blacksmiths manufactured tools for the railway. They made cold chisels, spanners, rivet sets, tinsmiths hammers and other tools.

1.) Main Locomotive Shop (includes Erecting, Blacksmith, Boiler, Machine, Air Brake, Pipe,

Electrical, Sheet Metal, Paint, Maintenance, and Carpenter Departments 307 X 773 total area 238,864 ft.²

2.) Tender and Wheelshop (L shaped building) 80 feet by 263 by 80 x 180 total square feet. 35,480

3.) Pattern Shop and Storage 31 feet by 162 feet total square feet 5,022.

4.) Foundry 80′ x 203′ total square feet 16,240.

5.) Stores Department and Offices (2 stories), 60 feet by 252 feet total square feet. 30,240.

6.) Oil House, 4,328.

7.) Coach Shop (Has electric traveling transfer table conveying coaches to and from the.

15 repair tracks 146 feet by 362 file feet total square feet. 52,892.

8.) Planing Mill, 80′ x 303′ total square feet. 24,240

9.) Power House 9,865 ft.².

10.) Freight Car Heavy Repair Shop 231′ x 303′ total square feet 69,993

11.) Mess Hall, and Apprentice Classroom, and Mess Hall Staff.

Quarters 31 feet by 269 feet total square feet 8582

12.) Scrap Dock total square feet 4400

Total square feet of buildings, 499,808

Total acres for buildings, 11.5 plus 2 acres for miscellaneous buildings, total 13.5 acres.

Approximate area of the yard housing all buildings, trackage etc. total 213 acres

The construction started on April 1, 1912 and was finished by March 15, 1913. An estimated 1200 to 1500 men were engaged on the shops construction job.

The Powerhouse had a 200 foot reinforced concrete smokestack and six 350 hp boilers to supply steam heat and steam power to drive a large heating fans installed in all shops except the main offices, oil house, mess hall, scrap dock, and other outlying smaller buildings which were equipped with steam radiators. The powerhouse also ahead, three electrically driven air compressors to provide high-pressure air to power tools used throughout the various shops. Close by was a 125,000 gallon water tank placed on a steel 70 foot tower. The planing mill, too required a lot of expensive woodworking machinery.

Advertisement from Railway Age 1913 by Westinghouse Church Kerr & Co. Engineers and Contractors 37 Wall St New York who built the Ogden Shop complex. Good view showing East end of Locomotive Shop and Lagging Shed on right hand side.

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June
02
Posted on 02-06-2008
Filed Under (Calgary 1960s, CPR, Many Jobs and Trades, Uncategorized) by Broken Rail

The above photograph shows the Ogden Shops complex the Locomotive Shop is the long building running horizontally in the foreground.

It was now November, and winter had set in, I decided to try to get an apprenticeship at the CPR’s Ogden shops. To do this, you had to go to the main gate and talk to the CPR Police officer on duty, he would give you permission to go down to the apprentice classroom in the Locomotive Shop. You then walked down the ramp, passing the administration office, and stores department and enter the Locomotive Shop through a doorway on the northwest corner of the building. You were now at, the West End of the blacksmiths shop, and it was quite a contrast from the winter weather outside, to walk through this department with its men and machinery that looked like they came out of the last century, at least it was nice and warm with all of their blacksmith’s fires. The apprentice school was up above a fan room that circulated heat through that quarter of the shop. The apprentice room teacher was Austin Case, and he gave you an exam on mathematics and physics to see your proficiency in these topics. If you passed the exam, which I did, you were then sent to the main administration office to get the paperwork you needed before you could start working. This included taking a medical, and seeing that I was 16 years old. I had to get and indenture document signed by my parents to enter an apprenticeship. The most popular trades, offered at Ogden were Machinist, Diesel Mechanic and Electrician these were all filled, there was vacancies in the other trades of Boilermaker, Blacksmith, Pipefitter, Sheet Metal Worker, and Carman. I decided to become a sheet metal worker or tinsmith apprentice. I would be working in a main Locomotive Shop which was a huge building with all the trades mentioned except Carmen who worked in the No.1 Car Repair Shop where boxcars, gondolas, flatcars and other freight rolling stock were fixed, and the No.2 Coach Shop were passenger cars were refurbished and repaired. My first day of work I met my Foreman Ed Barraclogh a gray-haired gentleman with glasses who wore a gray suit and hat he made me feel welcome and I was assigned to a journeyman named John, who was my mate. John was from Rhodesia where he had worked for the railway there. This shop complex was built in 1913 to overhaul steam locomotives, the last steam engine out shopped from here was in 1957, since then, diesel locomotives were overhauled. The tinsmiths duties with the locomotives were to look after, all sheet-metal in the cabs of the locomotives, and the grillwork on the sides of passenger locomotives, repair radiators, and any other sheet-metal work on the locomotives, we also did all the stainless steel sheet metal work on Dayliners that were involved in collisions. We also did it a lot of work for the stores department, making toolboxes, traction motors shims, funnels and oil cans. Our other duties involved maintenance of the shop buildings, and insulating pipes, this goes back to the steam era when tinsmiths insulated the boilers of steam engines with asbestos lagging, and maintained the outer sheet-metal jacket of the engine. I will write more tomorrow on the history of the shops.

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June
02
Posted on 02-06-2008
Filed Under (Calgary 1960s, Many Jobs and Trades) by Broken Rail

After I was laid off from Canadian Trailmobile, I was looking for work again. The federal government provided an agency to help people out of work, find jobs. I went there and was sent on a wild goose chase looking for employment, from whom they recommended. I never did find a job through this department of the government. Any job I ever found was either through friends, or knocking door-to-door in the industrial part of Southeast Calgary. A friend of mines, father ran a grader for an outfit called Pioneer Paving and I got a job there as a laborer. They were building and paving roads up by the University of Calgary in the districts of Brentwood and Charleswood, I had a job on pit run it involved moving big rocks away from the curbs before the next layer of finer rock filler was brought in. We worked 10-hour days so I was paid overtime for two hours every day. After a couple of weeks, they put me on a new assignment, they drove me over to the Foothills Hospital that was just built and the parking lot was all paved. On the new asphalt there were circles sprayed with spray paint, and there was a small tractor with a compressor and jackhammer. Underneath the asphalt where these circles were painted, was a manhole cover and bell casting. My job was to drive the tractor over to where a circle was, and use the jackhammer to make a circle and uncover the manhole when this was done another laborer would help me lift the bell casting off of the 5 foot concrete sewer pipe, and shim the casting with 2 inch bricks, this would bring the manhole cover flush with the pavement. I liked this job as I was left alone to do it with no supervision. The job lasted about three weeks until the end of October, and the work was all done for that season. My last job was to drive the tractor back to Pioneer Paving’s yard off of Blackfoot Trail on 44th Ave. S.E.

Here is one of my daily time sheets from Pioneer Paving Limited, dated Wednesday, October 27, 1965. I worked from 07:30 a.m. until 06:00 p.m. I got half an hour off for lunch, and worked a total of 10 hours, 2 at overtime rates of time and one half per hour.

Pioneer Paving Ltd timesheet Oct 27, 1965

Pioneer Paving Limited Business Card.

Pioneer Paving Limited card

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June
02
Posted on 02-06-2008
Filed Under (Calgary 1960s) by Broken Rail

In September 1964 I started high school at Western Canada High School. The School was about 2 miles from my house so I was able to get there on my Honda in about 15 minutes. My classroom was on the second floor of the West Wing; there were lots of new people from all over the south side of the city. My classmate CJ, who sat next to me, was from Ogden, he suggested I come out and visit him some weekend. Now Bowness, Forest Lawn, and Ogden had reputations as being tough districts, I mentioned to one of my classmates that I was going out to Ogden, he replied that people get knifed out there. Anyways, one nice Saturday in September I hopped on my Honda and made my sojourn out to Ogden to visit CJ. It was quite interesting, Ogden was like a time warp it reminded me of the 50s, it was working class district and a lot of the residents worked in the CPR’s Ogden shops. CJ introduced me to some other students from Western, who had motorcycles; we went riding around the district, and down to a place by the Bow River called the Beaverdam. It was like a big island isolated by a channel that beavers had used. I found out later that this was a big camping site for the First Nations people, and they had used it as a buffalo jump. Ogden was home to the cities Single Men’s Hostel that was located since 1935 in the old Ogden Hotel that had been built in 1912, more on this later. Across the street was Chuck and Beulah’s dairy bar, affectionately called the “Greasy Spoon” this was the local hangout, and reminded me later of American Graffiti. Two blocks down on 26 Street was Cable’s and Featherstone general stores, they were old-fashioned stores with oiled wooden floors and along with South Hill and Millican were the only grocers until Safeway’s built in 1966.

Back to my education, I rode my Honda to school on till Winter set in, then I had to ride the Calgary Transit Systems buses, I had to walk three blocks down to 33rd Ave. to catch No.7 the South Calgary to 14th St and 17th Ave S.W. where I had to transfer to one of the Kilarney buses down a 17th Ave to 6th Street where the school was. I hated riding buses, I always seemed to just miss one and have to wait 15 minutes for the next one. The only interesting thing I saw riding the bus was during December 1964. There was a café called Jimmy’s on the NW corner of 14th St and 17th Ave SW that had caught on fire and burned during the night. It was cold winter weather at that time and the whole building was like an Ice Palace, from all the water the fire department had used trying to put out the fire. During World War I, there was an interesting accident on the NE corner list intersection that my father talked about. There was a business called Crooks Drugstore at that time there were street cars that had to make a sharp right turn at the bottom of 14th St hill, a streetcar coming down the hill had a brake failure, and could not make the sharp right-hand turn, and ended up on its side, inside of the drugstore. Not much exciting happened at school, and finally spring arrived and I was able to ride my Honda again. One evening in April I was driving home from Ogden, it was dark, and I was three blocks from home, going up 29th Ave behind King Edward School on 16th St. there was a controlled intersection was stop signs on both sides of 29th Ave, which gave me the right of way. There was a car stopped at a stop sign on the North side of the intersection, a car ahead of me went through this intersection safely. I approached the intersection and the car stopped a big 1958 Buick decided to proceed into the intersection, he was on a hill so he really gunned it, resulting in him hitting my bike square on. Luckily I was thrown from the bike, and ended up landing on my tailbone on the SW side of the intersection. My bike was a mess with both front tires of the Buick sitting on top of it. I was wearing rubber boots, and the bumper of the Buick drove my brake pedal through the boot and in to the ball of my right foot, they took me by ambulance to the General Hospital for x-rays, which they looked at, and seeing no fractures they sent me home. My family doctor looked at the x-rays next day and found three fractures in my right ankle. So this laid me up at home for the rest of the school year. I failed some of my classes, and would have to make that up. In the fall I was to register for Grade 11, but me and a buddy from Ogden decided to spend our textbook money on beer. The school was really full this year due to the closing of Central High School, so by the time I got around to registering most of the classes were full, I ended up with one class of Chemistry at nine o’clock in the morning, and one class of Social Studies at 3 p.m. in the afternoon. The chemistry class was really hard, I found out later they were teaching from the wrong textbook, one from grade 12 so it was no wonder it was so difficult. After a couple of weeks of this, I was fed up and decided to quit school and go look for a job. Me and my friend Dave went looking for a job we were going from business to business in the Bonnybrook District, we went into a place called Meldon Roofing, and asked if there were hiring, to which they said no. We started walking down the road a couple of blocks, when a truck from Meldon’s pulled up beside us, and the driver said he needed one of us. So we flipped a coin, and Dave won the job, which I found out later was a job from hell. Working around hot asphalt, and lots of physical work, pulling up pails of fine gravel to the rooftops of the buildings they were repairing. I continued on and through a friend found a job at Canadian Trail Mobile, a shop where they repaired truck trailers. My job was in the Store Department doing inventory, and later sweeping up the shop. After a couple of weeks I Was laid-off, and in search of employment once again.

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June
02
Posted on 02-06-2008
Filed Under (Calgary 1960s) by Broken Rail

I had a paper route delivering the Star Weekly a newsmagazine published in Toronto that came out on Mondays, I had about 40 customers scattered around South Calgary, so there was a lot of walking involved, and I would have to go back and collect money at times, I was paid five cents a copy so made about two dollars a week, in Grade 7 I got a carrier route delivering The Southside Mirror, and flyers from the Hudson Bay, Woodwards and Eatons to big department stores in Calgary. I had 285 houses, apartments, and businesses to deliver them to on my route and that ran from 18th St S.W. to 24th St S.W. (now Crowchild Trail) on 32nd and 33rd Avenues. I delivered the Mirror on Thursdays, and the other Flyers on different days of the week, the South Side Mirror was small about 30 pages, and I could carry them all with one canvas paper bag, the Flyers from The Bay, and Eatons were larger and heavier and I required two canvas paper bags to carry them, Woodwards flyers came out once a month on Tuesdays when they had their $1.49 Days sales, with the Mirror, and flyers. I was paid a penny apiece and was able to earn about seven dollars a week. I did this through junior high school, and it was good exercise, it could be a little brutal through the winter when there was lots of snow. . in Grade 8 some of the local businesses. I delivered to on 33rd Avenue asked me if I would be interested them delivering their flyers around the districts, being enterprising me and a friend of mine agreed to do it and split the money . We delivered fliers for Fechs a European delicatessen, and a furrier Jon Vozniuk who lived on 33rd Avenue and had his business about a block away East of 21st Street. We delivered to the districts of Bankview, South Calgary, and Altadore 10,000 in total, and made $50 each, it was in the summer and the Flyers were just one or two pages although it involved a lot of walking the renumeration was worth it. I saved every penny I made, and my father said he would double every cent I made. So at the and of grade 9 I had $500 enough to buy a motorscooter, some of my older friends had Italian Vespas that were 125 cc. so I was inclined to buy one of them, Simpson Sears, had a their own brand made by Vespa so I was thinking of one of them. In junior high school. On weekends we used to go down to Kaynes motorcycle shop located in downtown Calgary at 515 4th Street, S.E. In an old wooden structure and drool over the Triumph’s, BSA’s, Norton’s the English motorcycles, and of course the Harley-Davidson’s these were big bikes and you had to be 16 to operate one, but 14 to 16-year-olds could drive scooters, or small motorcycles under 125 cc’s. My mother had seen an advertisement in the paper, so my father and I went to Bow Cycle out in the district of Bowness they were selling Hondas, I was familiar with the 50 cc Honda Cub, a small scooter, but they had come out with some larger bikes and we purchased a brand-new Honda 90, black in color. This was a dream come true for me, and I never regretted it; it gave me the freedom of mobility, to go and discoverer parts of the city that I had never seen before. I drove on the new Blackfoot Trail in S.E. Calgary over the Alyth overpass that ran over the CPR train yard. I returned and took the exit on Portland Street that went through the industrial district of Bonnybrook. I crossed the Bow River on the silver. Bonnybrook Bridge that took me to Ogden Road that ran along the Imperial Oil Refinery. Travel through Ogden on 24th St, and ended up a the Canadian Industry Limited’s explosive plant, where they made dynamite (this is now the district of Douglasdale) the plant was closed in 1975 after an explosion in the mixing room killed four employees.

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June
02
Posted on 02-06-2008
Filed Under (Calgary 1950s, Uncategorized) by Broken Rail

This picture was taken in front of King Edward School 1720, 30th Ave., S.W. in June of 1956.
King Edward School, Grade 1 photo 1955-56
Front row: (Left to Right) Jamie, unknown, Don Hardie, Ross Berg, unknown, unknown, unknown,
Second row: (Left to Right) unknown, unknown, unknown, John Turner, unknown, unknown, unknown, Grace Lackey
Third row: (Left to Right.) Unknown, unknown, unknown, Grace Gauley, unknown, unknown, Judy McAuley, unknown.
Back row: (Left to Right) Rusty Austin, unknown, Dave Cobb, Larry Buchan, Earl Wagner, Philip Risby, Ole Olson, Glenn
back row forth from the left hand King Edward School was built in 1912, one of 19 sandstone schools built in Calgary between 1894 and 1914. It is in the district of South Calgary, my uncle Fred, and my dad’s best friend, Jim Atkinson went to school here the first year it was opened. My father attended the second year. I was in school here from grade 1 until grade 9 in the summer of 1964. The school was a block and a half from my home so it was a short walk to school for me. Due to declining enrollment in the school was closed in 2001, and it looks like it will be torn down. With the real estate of one city block it will probably be developed for housing, unless someone comes to the rescue and finds another use for the building. The school as I mentioned was built of sandstone, a popular building material for many of the buildings in Calgary in that era, Calgary was called the “Sandstone City” but sadly many of these buildings have faced the wrecking ball, and are no more. I have also attached a picture by Alison Jackson showing the back of the school on 29th Ave. The girls side on the left, and the boys side on the right. During the summer holidays the top of the fire escape made an excellent viewpoint to watch the fireworks from the Calgary Stampede, a rodeo and fair, that is held in early July.
King Edward School from 29th Avenue Southwest, the right-hand side of the school contained a playroom in the basement on the back side for recess when the weather was bad. My Grade 6 classroom was in the front of the basement covered by the portable classroom trailer, my Grade 9 classroom was above it. Between the fire escapes on the right-hand side in the basement was the boiler room for heating the school, on the left-hand side was my grade 5 classroom, my grade 8 classroom was on the second floor above it. In the 1970s this part of the building started to fall away from the main part of the school and was torn down, along with the fire escape.
A Photo of the front of the school taken in the 1920s from 30th Avenue Southwest, showing what it looked like before the modern auditorium was built circa 1956-57
This front view of King Edward School from the 1920s clearly shows how it looked when I started there in 1955, not much had changed, and my grade one classroom was inside the front entrance on the right-hand side. It was a more modern classroom with brown linoleum floors, individual tables that would seat six students sitting across from each other on small chairs, my first traumatic experience was getting slapped on the wrists by my teacher Miss Down for copying my classmates work, which I was innocent of, to get their we had to go in through the BOYS entrance in the back on the right-hand side, and climb one flight of stairs and cross through the double doors of the auditorium that was located to the left of the entrance doors with the stage on the North side if my memory serves me correct, this all changed when the new auditorium, with industrial art shops, and home economics classrooms, with an auxiliary gymnasium in the basement were built around 1956. My grade 2 and 3 classrooms were side-by-side on the second floor in the left wing Miss. Black taught grade 2 above the stairs on the GIRLS entrance and Miss Watt taught grade 3 next to her they were to old maid teachers with granny glasses, and button up black leather shoes, Miss Black were short and stout, and Miss Watt Was tall and skinny and looked a lot like my grandmother, both my older sisters were taught by them seven years previous to my arrival, the classrooms were ancient, and had probably not changed a bit since the school opened, they had unpolished hardwood floors, and cast-iron desks with fold up seats, the blackboards were made of black slate, with dark hardwood framing, here we learn to print with pencils and in grade 3 to start writing, Miss Watt even had a windup gramophone for playing records, I remember her clearly telling us about world events like the launch of the Sputnik that started the space race on October 4, 1957, when a contrast from this old school room. My grade 4 class was on the second floor to the left of the entrance with Mrs. Campbell we started writing with pen and ink, the small double windowed rooms above the entrance were teacher lounges, and the other small double windowed rooms in the wings were used as the nurses room, and for other functions, across from the main entrance was the vice principal’s office on the North side. My grade 5 classroom with Mr. Norton was in the basement facing northward on the right-hand side the boiler room and mechanical heating was on the left-hand side, and the boys washroom was in the basement left of the main entrance, and the girls on the right-hand side. My grade 6 classroom was in the basement in the left-hand side wing with Mr. Houghton there were two basement playrooms on the north side of each wing where we would go for recess in inclement weather. In 1961, I started junior high school in grade 7, my teacher Mrs. Kellogh classroom was on the third floor on the left-hand side, this is when we started going to other classrooms to take courses, Mrs. K taught us art, next to her was Mrs. Cheal the music teacher, across the hall from us was Mr. Kennedy then, grade 9 science teacher, I can’t recall what the other classroom was in the north east corner of this floor, I remember Mr. Kennedy was quite involved with the church playing and restoring pipe organs, he had a bunch of parts stored in the attic of the roof of the left-hand wing. My grade 8 class with Miss Bales was on the second floor on the right side facing northwards, and finally my grade 9 class with Mr. Longair are Vice Principal at the time was on the top of the stairs in the left wing in the front, we took literature from Mrs. Murray on the second floor in the classroom west of my grade 8 classroom, the old auditorium was made into a library to the right of the entrance, and Miss Cochlan’s English classroom faced northwards. The next picture was taken before Christmas 1958. It shows my King Edward School Grade 4 photo 1958-59.
Front row: (Left to Right) Margaret Deesman, Jerry Dobos, Philip Risby, Milton Meehan, unknown twin sisters, Judy McAuley, Kyra Jojonek, Ole Olson, unknown, Don Hardie.
Middle row: Celia, unknown, Herbie Grey, Wayne Yarjau, Carol Lauderoutte, Grace Wiley, Dave Chibry, Warwick Gray, unknown, unknown, Sherry Meehan, Don Kennedy, Dave Cobb.
Back row: (Left to Right) Grace Lackey, Margaret Lund, Alice Jones, Brian McCreary, Gary, Tony Kraft, Barbara Dunphy, Edward “Butch” Taylor, Rusty Austin, Winston Mitchell, Larry Buchan. The other picture is the view of our backyard at 1921 30th Ave. SW. this was a very old house built before World War I, and many additions were added to it in the 1930s, my parents bought the house in 1945 after the end of World War II.
King Edward School from 29th Ave.
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Homestead 1921 30 Ave. SW

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